Canadian Plastics

NPE shapes the future of plastics

PHENOMENAL GROWTH OVER 50 YEARSThe first NPE show was small but had a large impact. Held in 1946 at New York City's Grand Central Palace, it was open to the general public. The show occupied 24,000 sq...

February 1, 2000   Canadian Plastics



PHENOMENAL GROWTH OVER 50 YEARS

The first NPE show was small but had a large impact. Held in 1946 at New York City’s Grand Central Palace, it was open to the general public. The show occupied 24,000 sq. ft. of exhibit space.

This year it will occupy 1.1 million sq. ft of exhibit space, and 85,000 visitors from 100 countries are expected. The exhibition and conference take place June 19 to 23 at Chicago’s McCormick Place.

Exhibits have become more lavish over the years. In 1979, Davis-Standard advertised that it would give away free extruders at the show. They delivered — a free Play-Doh toy which presses the modeling clay through a die to every visitor.

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In 1985, B.F. Goodrich showed an entire PVC house, complete with patio and fencing.

The first Canadian pavilion made its appearance in 1988, just months before the Free Trade Agreement was ratified.

NEW TECHNOLOGY UNVEILED

NPE has always been a launching point for new technology. Rigid vinyl products made their debut in 1952, as did styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN).

Commercial grades of HDPE were launched by several resin producers in 1958, and many engineering resins also made their first appearances that year.

In 1985, companies such as HPM, Battenfeld and Milacron showed “lights out” capabilities with injection molding cells that incorporated multiple machines, quick mold changing systems, robots and data acquisition systems.

More recently, metallocene-catalyzed polyolefins and all-electric molding machines were big news in 1994.

Anticipation is building over possible introductions of new technology and equipment at NPE 2000. As usual, the show will definitely forecast the future of plastics, as it always has.

REGISTER NOW – FOR FREE

As well as being free, registration is simple. You can register on-line at www.npe.org. Despite what the web site may say, Canadians and foreign visitors can register for free until May 19. Registration for the show includes the NPE 2000 technical conference.

Or, if you received a registration package by mail, fill out the form and mail or fax it back. If you haven’t received a registration package, call the show sponsors, SPI, at 202/974-5235 to have one sent.

On-site registration is US$60.


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