Canadian Plastics

Ontario investing $9.3M in automotive and advanced manufacturing skills training

The innovative projects will train and re-train thousands for in-demand jobs.

September 1, 2020   Canadian Plastics

Ontario’s provincial government is investing $9.3 million in 11 new projects to help approximately 2,000 students and job seekers train or re-train for careers in the automotive and advanced manufacturing sectors.

The funding will support projects from a range of organizations, including auto manufacturers, industry associations, training providers and public universities and colleges.

The training projects range from hands-on learning opportunities for students in co-op or internship settings to short-duration college courses that help laid-off workers learn to operate high-tech machinery or gain credentials for jobs in the auto or advanced manufacturing sector.

The companies/programs being invested in, and the amounts, are:

  • Automotive Parts Manufacturers Association: $2,242,337 to create up to 669 hands-on learning opportunities in the auto sector for college and university students, graduates and apprentices across Ontario. This program is underway.
  • Fiat Chrysler Automobiles: $480,000 for the FCA Canada Student Employment Experience. It will create up to 160 hands-on learning opportunities in research, production and office roles for students in Windsor, Brampton and Etobicoke. This program is underway.
  • George Brown College: $2,521,352 for their Drive Ability – Opening Doors Program, which aims to create up to 600 hands-on learning opportunities for college and university students and establish a talent pipeline for the automotive and advanced manufacturing sector. George Brown College is partnering with five public colleges and York University on this work. This project is underway.
  • George Brown College: $207,805 for a second new project to train up to 22 jobseekers and laid-off workers on computer-controlled technology and state-of-the-art precision machinery. By taking this program, people will gain a credential that will help them start a career in advanced manufacturing. This program is scheduled to begin in October.
  • Skills for Change of Metro Toronto: $504,000 for their Welding and Employment Skills Training Program. This project will help up to 24 laid-off, at-risk or under-utilized auto or advanced manufacturing workers gain a new credential and transition to other roles or sectors within the auto or advanced manufacturing industry. This program is scheduled to begin in October.
  • Ford Motor Company of Canada: $954,324 to create up to 244 co-op learning opportunities that prepare college and university students for the fields of advanced manufacturing, vehicle connectivity and business operations. This project is underway.
  • Humber College: $279,101 for their Advanced Manufacturing Micro-Credentials Program in collaboration with advanced manufacturing employers. Humber College is offering up to 48 laid-off workers and jobseekers an opportunity to complete seven new “micro-credentials” that prepare them for employment in advanced manufacturing. Micro-credentialing certifies an individual’s achievements in specific skills and are earned more quickly than degrees or diplomas. This program is underway.
  • Canadian Skills Training and Employment Coalition: $791,429 to create up to 180 hands-on learning opportunities with automotive employers for college and university students. This program is underway.
  • Seneca College Newnham Campus: $297,403 for Computer Numerical Control for Advanced Manufacturing to train up to 130 jobseekers and laid-off workers. This project will allow people to operate computer-controlled tools and machinery, help them gain a new credential and prepare them for employment in the advanced manufacturing and aerospace sector. This project is planned to begin in September.
  • Sheridan College: $175,650 to train up to 24 workers to operate computer-controlled machinery, help them gain a new credential and prepare them for employment in the manufacturing sector. This project is planned to begin in September.
  • Centennial College: $871,429 for their Advanced Manufacturing & Automation Technology Experiential Learning Initiative to create up to 200 hands-on learning opportunities for college and university students and prepare them for careers in the automotive sector. This project is planned to begin in September.

“Ontario’s auto and manufacturing employers have made game-changing contributions in the fight against COVID-19 by re-tooling their production lines to make personal protective equipment and medical supplies,” said Premier Ford during the announcement on Aug. 31.

“As we gradually reopen the province, we are making strategic investments to train and re-train people to ensure all businesses get the talent they need, and everyone can get back to work and put food on the table to support Ontario’s economic recovery.”

 


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