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Contest winner’s idea to ban single-use plastics will become private member’s bill in Ottawa

Ben Korving is the winner of the Create Your Canada contest, which allows people to submit ideas for new laws – and his idea was to reduce single-use plastics in food packaging.


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December 12, 2018 by Canadian Plastics

Thanks of a unique contest, a Terrace, B.C. man now has the chance to possibly influence the use of single-use plastics in food packaging.

Ben Korving is the winner of the Create Your Canada contest, which allows people to submit ideas for new laws – and his idea was to reduce single-use plastics in food packaging.

Started by Skeena-Bulkley Valley MP Nathan Cullen in 2009, the contest was originally designed for high school students in his riding to participate in the law-making process. This year, constituents of all ages were allowed to participate.

“My biggest frustration is with packaging in general, specifically the [plastic] … that has to get tossed into the garbage after one use because they have no subsequent life,” Korving told the CBC. “And if you look at your day-to-day examples, you’ll probably find dozens within the span of a few minutes: food packaging, Styrofoam, various metals, etc.”

Korving’s idea to ban all single-use plastics in consumer products that aren’t either recyclable or compostable beat more than 100 other entries to win this year’s contest, having been picked by a panel of judges made up of community leaders across northwestern B.C.

Korving will be flown to Ottawa in early 2019 to present his idea and have it turned into a private member’s bill and tabled in the House of Commons.

In Canada, a private member’s bill is a bill introduced in the House of Commons by a member of parliament who is not a cabinet minister. A private member’s bill follows the same legislative process as a government bill, but the time allocated for its consideration is restricted. Private Members’ Bills may be considered only during one of the daily Private Members’ Hours. (As a rule, very few private member’s bills become law.)