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FDA bans BPA in infant formula packaging

The Food and Drug Administration will ban the use of bisphenol A (BPA)-based epoxy resins in coatings for baby formula packaging in the U.S., according to a ruling published on July 12.


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July 15, 2013 by Canadian Plastics

The Food and Drug Administration will ban the use of bisphenol A (BPA)-based epoxy resins in coatings for baby formula packaging in the U.S., according to a ruling published on July 12.

According to FDA, all U.S. infant formula manufacturers have abandoned the use of BPA-based epoxy resins as coatings in packing and have no plans to introduce the resins into the market. In issuing the new ban, however, FDA said it still considers BPA to be safe for packaging.

The ban comes in response to a March 2012 petition from then-Rep. Edward Markey, a Democrat from Massachusetts. “With viable alternatives available for BPA, I urge all companies to abandon the use of this toxic chemical, and I will continue my work in the Senate to ensure our entire food supply is free from this damaging chemical,” Markey said in a July 11 statement.

The ban was greeted with equanimity by the American Chemistry Council, which has fought against anti-BPA legislation in the past. “We believe this action by FDA will bring clarity for consumers and will eliminate any lingering confusion about the presence of BPA in infant formula packaging,” said Steven Hentges, head of the ACC’s Polycarbonate and BPA Global Group. “As noted by FDA, their action is not based on any finding or conclusion that packaging containing BPA is unsafe.”

BPA is used primarily to make polycarbonate plastic for use in electronics, automobiles, CDs and DVDs, and food and drink containers. It exhibits hormone-like properties and has raised concern specifically about its suitability in consumer products and food containers.


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