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BPA not at danger levels in plastic drinking bottles: Health Canada

Tests by Health Canada on polycarbonate (PC) drinking bottles have found levels of the chemical bisphenol A (B...


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July 20, 2009 by Canadian Plastics

Tests by Health Canada on polycarbonate (PC) drinking bottles have found levels of the chemical bisphenol A (BPA) that are well below the toxic level. 

 

In a report released on July 9, Health Canada said that levels of BPA from the non-polycarbonate water products were below the “method detection limit” of 0.5 parts per billion.

 

The bottled water testing included samples of 54 different products representing 21 brands by 16 companies. They were bought in Ottawa stores in April 2008.

 

The containers were made of metal, glass, high-density polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate and PC.

 

“The low levels of BPA in bottles currently available for sale in Canada confirms Health Canada’s previous assessment that the currently dietary exposure to BPA through food packaging is not expected to pose a health risk to the consumer,” said Health Canada’s Food Directorate in a statement that accompanied its research report.

 

Concentrations ranged from 0.5 to a high of 8.82 parts per billion, with an average of 1.5 parts per billion.

 

The Health Canada report noted that an adult would have to drink 264 gallons of water every day to even approach the safe intake limit for BPA recently established in Canada.

 

“This really helps to clarify Health Canada’s view,” said Steve Hentges, executive director of the polycarbonate/BPA global group of the plastics division of the American Chemistry Council. “This new government data confirms Health Canada’s previous conclusion that exposure to BPA through food packaging uses is not expected to pose a health risk to the general population, including newborns and young children.”