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Star Plastics expands into new facility, doubles molding capacity

Custom injection molder and assembler Star Plastics Inc. has moved into a new 73,000-square-foot (sq. ft.) operating facility on Drew Road in Mississauga, Ont.


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October 1, 2006 by Canadian Plastics

(Left to right) Carlo Nudi, operations manager Tony Suriano, Mississauga mayor Hazel McCallion and company owner Jas Dhami in front of Star Plastics' new facility.

(Left to right) Carlo Nudi, operations manager Tony Suriano, Mississauga mayor Hazel McCallion and company owner Jas Dhami in front of Star Plastics' new facility.


Custom injection molder and assembler Star Plastics Inc. has moved into a new 73,000-square-foot (sq. ft.) operating facility on Drew Road in Mississauga, Ont.

In the presence of government officials, industry insiders, Star Plastics workers and others, Mississauga mayor Hazel McCallion cut the ribbon to open the plant on Sept. 14. With 7,000 sq. ft. of office space and 66,000 sq. ft. of manufacturing and warehouse space, the facility will house the company’s staff of approximately 150 employees and its 36 injection molding machines.

General manager Carlo Nudi described the move as an important step forward for Star Plastics, which was founded in 1989 by current owner Jas Dhami. “This marks a fresh start for us,” Nudi explained. “At our previous location on Bramalea Road, we had 18 machines. We have introduced an additional 18 heavier tonnage machines into the new facility and we have space for two more machines if needed.”

Along with these new machines, the company is implementing management and administration changes, Nudi said. “We are currently restructuring, creating new departments and building a strong infrastructure with dedicated players. Our next goal is to strengthen the engineering department to accommodate more value-added assemblies.”

Nudi credited Star Plastics’ success in part to the company’s emphasis on diversification. “We are committed to remaining diversified among the automotive, industrial and consumer markets,” he said. “We don’t want to grow any one of those sectors too much, and we don’t want one to dominate the other.” He also identified the importance of slow, planned growth. “It’s important not to over-extend,” Nudi said. “We have enough capacity right now to handle all of the existing business and we have put the brakes on. We are not accepting any new immediate transfer business and are only quoting on future business from one year on and further.”