Canadian Plastics

New polyester challenges PBT

Shell Chemical's Corterra polytrimethylene terephthalate (PTT) polymer "is a viable replacement, as well as a valuable choice, for new developments in engineering thermoplastics applications where pol...

April 1, 2000   Canadian Plastics



Shell Chemical’s Corterra polytrimethylene terephthalate (PTT) polymer “is a viable replacement, as well as a valuable choice, for new developments in engineering thermoplastics applications where polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) would be candidates, including molded and extruded applications in the automotive and electrical/electronics markets,” says Barry Cristea, Corterra polymer business manager for ETPs at Shell Chemical.

Cristea notes that Corterra PTT has outperformed PBT in some applications where strength and toughness are critical.

Thermoplastics compounder RTP Company has worked with Shell on market evaluations of the new resin. “After conducting a bettery of evaluations, we found compounds based on Corterra displayed better tensile and structural strength than PBT, and displayed lower moisture absorption that PBT and nylon,” reports Kevin Marshall, market manager, RTP Company.

Marshall adds that polymer alloys, such as PTT alloyed with polycarbonate, PBT, PET, acrylic-styrene-acrylonitrile (ASA) and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS), hold significant promise for niche applications.

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Shell Chemicals 713/241-4544


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