Canadian Plastics

New Brunswick focused on plastics

Employment in the New Brunswick's plastics industry has been growing at 10 percent per year and sales in the plastics sector are growing at a rate of 16 to 20 percent. There are now about 36 companies...

December 1, 2000   Canadian Plastics



Employment in the New Brunswick’s plastics industry has been growing at 10 percent per year and sales in the plastics sector are growing at a rate of 16 to 20 percent. There are now about 36 companies in the province directly involved in plastics processing, and another 50 or so companies which use some type of plastic or rubber to manufacture products. A number of companies located in the province, including Ipex (Saint John), Seaplast (Saint John) and IPL (Edmunston) have recently completed major facility expansions.

The robust growth in the plastics sector is a sign of how far the province has come in publicizing the positive economic aspects of doing business here, as well as overcoming its image as a place too far removed from major markets to locate a manufacturing plant.

“We’re within a day’s drive of 100 million people,” says Tony Lampart, project executive, investment export, government of New Brunswick, pointing out the province’s proximity to the Northeast U.S. and the Toronto-Montreal corridor. Lampart notes that plastics is a good fit in the province because, unlike some goods, many plastic products are small, light and easily transportable. Likewise, transportation companies are often looking for a load to stick in an empty truck heading back to the U.S or Toronto/Montreal.

Lampart says the provincial and federal government have an array of programs designed to make businesses export ready. Lampart can be reached at 506/453-3455.

Advertisement

In order to meet the skills development needs of the province’s growing plastics industry, New Brunswick Community College is in the initial stages of developing a plastics training program at its Saint John and Campbellton campuses. According to Aline Munro, dean of business, engineering, technology and trade, the school is still exploring funding sources for the program, which, if it comes to fruition, would be closely aligned with the school’s mechanical engineering program. The course at the Saint John campus would be in English, while the course in Campbellton would be in French. The school is hoping to offer the program beginning in September 2001.

For more information Aline Munro can be contacted at 506/658-6794.


Print this page

Related Stories

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*