Canadian Plastics

Project aims to demonstrate "clean" olefins production

A consortium of Canadian companies has announced the kick-off of a project to demonstrate a more efficient method o...

May 12, 2005   Canadian Plastics

A consortium of Canadian companies has announced the kick-off of a project to demonstrate a more efficient method of manufacturing olefins. The consortium, which includes NOVA Chemicals and Quantiam Technologies Inc. based in Edmonton, has received a $1.45 million grant from Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC), as well as an investment of $8.3 million from other private and public sources.
Conventional hydrocarbon steam cracking used to produce olefins is the most energy intensive process in the chemical industry, with energy costs exceeding $10 billion a year and the production of significant emissions. Targeting furnace coils used in steam cracking, the consortium’s technology involves a new generation of catalytic coatings that are projected to allow for manufacturing at lower temperatures. In addition to reducing energy consumption and emissions, the technology could significantly improve plant efficiencies and profitability, according to a release. The industry produces more than 110 million tones annually of ethylene alone, valued at $80 billion.
"Quantium and our consortium partners are committed to the successful development and demonstration of this new nanomaterials technology to the benefit of Canada, our environment and all of our stakeholders," said Dr. Steve Petrone, president, Quantium Technologies.


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